Helping those in need in Avery County, N.C.

Charities

Charities We Support

Children’s Hope Alliance / Grandfather Home for Children

Childrens HopeChildren’s Hope Alliance is a 501c3 nonprofit organization with a long history of child advocacy and welfare dating back over 125 years. In 2014, Children’s Hope Alliance helped more than 3,500 children across North Carolina. All of the programs and services provided create hope for hurting children and families in three ways: healing the hurt, providing a safe home and encouraging a healthy start. Their mission: To provide a safe healing journey for hurting children and families – creating hope now and in the future.

Website: https://www.childrenshopealliance.org
Phone: 704-872-4157 / 1-800-320-4157

Avery County Humane Society

Humane Society AveryThe Avery County Humane Society is a 501c3 nonprofit organization that has been in operation since 1978. They have approximately 1,500 visitors per year and close to 800 pet adoptions in 2013. Their facility can house approximately 95 animals. They provide shelter, low cost spay/neuter and low cost shot clinics.

Phone: 828-733-2333
Email: [email protected]
Website: http://www.averyhumane.org/catalog/index.php

Feeding Avery Families

Feeding AveryFeeding Avery Families (FAF) is a non-profit Christian organization in Avery County dedicated to eliminating hunger by any means possible including monetary donations, volunteerism, or food donations.

Contact: Dick Larson
Phone: 828-783-8506      Email: [email protected]
Website/Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/feedingavery/timeline

Avery High Key Club

KiwanisKey Club is student-led organization which provides its members with opportunities to provide service, build character and develop leadership. The Avery High Key Club has been featured in AveryJournal.com. You can read more here, and on our own Community Stories Page here.

Phone: 828-898-3289

Volunteer Avery County

10301450_1405084526487620_329193968432375987_nVolunteer Avery County is a branch of Avery Senior Services that places volunteers with agencies in Avery County that are youth-, aging- or community-oriented and also specializes in providing resources to those in need.

Contact: Cindy Lindecamp
Phone: 828-737-0718
Email: [email protected]

Yellow Mountain Enterprises

YME-YYellow Mountain Enterprises is an adult day vocational program and operates under the umbrella of Avery Association for Exceptional Citizens. AAEC is a 501-C3 Non-profit organization for developmentally disabled adults. AAEC also operates the Avery County Group Home, an adult supervised living facility.

Phone:828-733-2944

Email: [email protected]

Why We Do What We Do

Watch our new video about the mission and purpose of the High Country Charitable Foundation.

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Grants

The goal of the Foundation is to support local Avery County charitable services.

Check back for information about the 2021 grant application.

View Grants

Annual Dinner Dance Fundraiser


HCCF holds an annual Dinner Dance Fundraiser each summer at Elk River Club in Banner Elk, NC. 2021 marks our SEVENTH year serving Avery County! We look forward to many more.

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Connect on Facebook

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Santa’s elves could take a lesson! The elves at High Country Charitable Foundation have been busy so that as many families as possible could experience some happiness during this Christmas season.

Avery County’s elves hauled and toted heavy loads—loads of surprises for Avery residents who needed some extra cheer this year.

Gifts galore for families and kids, coordinated by elves through Reaching Avery Ministry and Avery Project Christmas. Groceries galore, collected and distributed by the elves at Feeding Avery Families. And elves with sheriff’s badges from Cops for Kids, armed with gifts, friendly smiles and very special friendships.

All of these happy activities have taken place for a number of years—but this year the elves had to repack the sleigh and route the reindeer around the COVID grinch lurking in the shadows.

The well-oiled machine that delivered Avery Project Christmas formerly brought parents into a well-stocked Christmas store, allowing them to choose gifts and wrapping for their children. This year, school counselors worked with families to create wish lists. The counselors and staff members then shopped the lists and prepared to deliver gift bags to the families.

“Imagine in your mind the smiling joy of children who might have been anxious about what would arrive at their house for Christmas,” commented Avery Project Christmas volunteer Susan Carter. “Create in your mind the faces and appreciation of parents, and grandparents serving as parents, as they feel the excitement of being able to give the children they love a few gifts from their wish list.”

Feeding Avery Families (FAF)continues to feed growing numbers of folks: 600 families or 1,500 individuals a month, plus school backpacks and in-school pantries, plus six Community Pantries.

In addition to ramping up the numbers, FAF has volunteers who deliver to families who are unable to get to the outdoor distributions. “Families and friends become lifelines, just as High Country Charitable Foundation has been, in helping us provide these special meals,” according to FAF director Dick Larson.

“How wonderful it is to be able to celebrate over a special meal together,” Larson said. “What a blessing it is to be able to help.”

Sometimes changes are especially hard on elves. “Cops for Kids,” a special creation of the Avery County Sheriff’s Office, had to postpone a great mentoring experience, in exchange for a distant substitute. In previous years, a sheriff’s officer would go shopping with a child, purchase family gifts, have lunch together, and get to know each other. This year, according to the Great Elf, Sheriff Kevin Frye, officers collected wish lists and purchased gifts—then distributed them through drive-in delivery. The mentoring or bonding between officer and child was mostly lost.

The High Country Charitable elves know that changes are hard, and COVID and its problems and prohibitions are harder. But knowing that the Avery County elves are really hard workers, improvising to make it all worthwhile—they provided the funds to keep the Christmas joy alive in many Avery County homes.

Since 2015. The High Country Charitable Foundation has awarded financial grants to local public charities and other private foundations whose mission is to provide for needy Avery County residents and animals. Selected nonprofit organizations must be appropriately recognized by the IRS. Grants are not given to individuals and other restrictions apply. For more information visit highcountryfoundation.org.

Kali Sullins picks up food for family members, a couple with two young children. “At Feeding Avery Families, we have many instances like this, where the people needing assistance aren’t able to get to our facility by themselves,” according to director Dick Larson. “Families and friends become lifelines, just as HCCF has been, in helping us provide these special meals,” he said.

Avery County Sheriff Kevin Frye (left) and Lauren Mauney of the EAC Employee Action Committee stand side-by-side as they accept the High Country Charitable Foundation grant for the 2020 Cops for Kids program.
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Santa’s elves could take a lesson! The elves at High Country Charitable Foundation have been busy so that as many families as possible could experience some happiness during this Christmas season.

Avery County’s elves hauled and toted heavy loads—loads of surprises for Avery residents who needed some extra cheer this year.

Gifts galore for families and kids, coordinated by elves through Reaching Avery Ministry and Avery Project Christmas. Groceries galore, collected and distributed by the elves at Feeding Avery Families. And elves with sheriff’s badges from Cops for Kids, armed with gifts, friendly smiles and very special friendships.

All of these happy activities have taken place for a number of years—but this year the elves had to repack the sleigh and route the reindeer around the COVID grinch lurking in the shadows.

The well-oiled machine that delivered Avery Project Christmas formerly brought parents into a well-stocked Christmas store, allowing them to choose gifts and wrapping for their children. This year, school counselors worked with families to create wish lists. The counselors and staff members then shopped the lists and prepared to deliver gift bags to the families.

“Imagine in your mind the smiling joy of children who might have been anxious about what would arrive at their house for Christmas,” commented Avery Project Christmas volunteer Susan Carter. “Create in your mind the faces and appreciation of parents, and grandparents serving as parents, as they feel the excitement of being able to give the children they love a few gifts from their wish list.”

Feeding Avery Families (FAF)continues to feed growing numbers of folks: 600 families or 1,500 individuals a month, plus school backpacks and in-school pantries, plus six Community Pantries.

In addition to ramping up the numbers, FAF has volunteers who deliver to families who are unable to get to the outdoor distributions. “Families and friends become lifelines, just as High Country Charitable Foundation has been, in helping us provide these special meals,” according to FAF director Dick Larson.

“How wonderful it is to be able to celebrate over a special meal together,” Larson said. “What a blessing it is to be able to help.”

Sometimes changes are especially hard on elves. “Cops for Kids,” a special creation of the Avery County Sheriff’s Office, had to postpone a great mentoring experience, in exchange for a distant substitute. In previous years, a sheriff’s officer would go shopping with a child, purchase family gifts, have lunch together, and get to know each other. This year, according to the Great Elf, Sheriff Kevin Frye, officers collected wish lists and purchased gifts—then distributed them through drive-in delivery. The mentoring or bonding between officer and child was mostly lost.

The High Country Charitable elves know that changes are hard, and COVID and its problems and prohibitions are harder. But knowing that the Avery County elves are really hard workers, improvising to make it all worthwhile—they provided the funds to keep the Christmas joy alive in many Avery County homes.

Since 2015. The High Country Charitable Foundation has awarded financial grants to local public charities and other private foundations whose mission is to provide for needy Avery County residents and animals. Selected nonprofit organizations must be appropriately recognized by the IRS. Grants are not given to individuals and other restrictions apply. For more information visit highcountryfoundation.org.

Kali Sullins picks up food for family members, a couple with two young children. “At Feeding Avery Families, we have many instances like this, where the people needing assistance aren’t able to get to our facility by themselves,” according to director Dick Larson. “Families and friends become lifelines, just as HCCF has been, in helping us provide these special meals,” he said.

Avery County Sheriff Kevin Frye (left) and Lauren Mauney of the EAC Employee Action Committee stand side-by-side as they accept the High Country Charitable Foundation grant for the 2020 Cops for Kids program.Image attachmentImage attachment

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I am honored to be on the Board of this caring organization. Most of live elsewhere in the winter, but appreciate our summer neighbors and all they do. We are proud to give back to you and wish you Merry Christmas and a much better New Year.

Executive Director Tina Krause of Hospitality House displays the 2020 grant from the High Country Charitable Foundation.

"Hospitality House of Northwest North Carolina is grateful to receive this grant from the High Country Charitable Foundation.

Last year, Hospitality House provided 2,739 (out of a total 39,754) nights of shelter services to 35 Avery County individuals for a total cost of $87,658 at an average of $32.00 per day.

As the largest contributor from Avery County, the HCCF grant accounts for 11% of the total needed to house and support Avery County residents.

The continued support of HCCF will allow us to continue safely and stably housing homeless individuals and families in Avery County."

--
Todd Carter
... See MoreSee Less

Executive Director Tina Krause of Hospitality House displays the 2020 grant from the High Country Charitable Foundation.

Hospitality House of Northwest North Carolina is grateful to receive this grant from the High Country Charitable Foundation. 

Last year, Hospitality House provided 2,739 (out of a total 39,754) nights of shelter services to 35 Avery County individuals for a total cost of $87,658 at an average of $32.00 per day. 

As the largest contributor from Avery County, the HCCF grant accounts for 11% of the total needed to house and support Avery County residents. 

The continued support of HCCF will allow us to continue safely and stably housing homeless individuals and families in Avery County.

--
Todd Carter
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